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Well hello #Instagram!

I have been working and mentoring in social media for many, many years now and as part of that have been a very active user … of some platforms.  I was a huge Facebook and Twitter fan, followed closely by Pinterest.  Linkedin is Linkedin … great, functional but not really “fun”.  Then there was Instagram.

Many of my friends are huge Instagram fans but I just never really got it.  Instagram was just so all about “me, me, me” and selfies.  You couldn’t collect and share images in the same way you can on Pinterest, so what was the point other than to blow one’s own trumpet?  Now I did have an account, after all I work in social media, but just like my Snapchat account, I never used it.

Until recently.  I casually started browsing Instagram and playing with the app and started coming across travel images.  At the same time I also started posting more to Instagram.  And so the addiction began!

Actually what I discovered was a magical world of beautiful and breathtaking images from around the world.  As I sat in Zurich still nursing a broken heart I longed to get away and travel and Instagram acted as a balm for my soul as well as inspiration and hope for the future.  I too would travel and see some of these places.

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At the same time I also discovered the draw of checking to see if people had liked my images.  The draw of likes to my Facebook posts left me long ago … but here it was again on a different platform!  This does of course however support my theory of Instagram being very self-centred – here I was being all about me!

But Instagram is more than that I now see.  In fact I am now also looking at it with new eyes as I wonder if I should look to move some of my charity work for Hope for Romanian Strays here.  I am also providing a friend who’s just launched a new business with advice on how to grow their Instagram account, which is a learning experience in itself.  Each day I discover new things and each day I learn more.

And there we have it … I have become an Instagramer and love it!  Instagram provides a window to our beautiful world and turns out to be a marvelous place to roam.  If you are on Instagram please pop over and follow me.

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The era of digital nomads

In December one of my main client contracts will come to an end and as such I have been slowly starting to think about what I will do next year.  Much as I love living in Zurich it is a very expensive place to be based without a permanent job so I am toying with the idea of moving somewhere cheaper.  Having also just had my heartbroken by a Swiss chap I am also less happy here than I was and contemplating a move.

Traditionally people would move based on where their job is and for many the first move abroad is the result of a job offer.  This was true for me too – the first time I moved abroad as an adult was an office transfer from the McKinsey London office to their Zurich office.  Since then I have become a veritable frequent mover and have lived in Switzerland 5 times, Spain twice, Denmark once and London twice.  Most of the moves have been work related but not all, and not all by choice.  Some would say I’ve had my fair share of bad luck with work – redundancy, the brand I was working on failing in PhIII, interview & reality not matching up, etc. – but I like to think of it as good luck.  It is thanks to my luck that I have had this truly interesting career, with a breadth of highly relevant experience, with multiple organisations and in multiple countries.

It is thanks to this experience that I am also able to seriously consider not only what my next job will be but also seriously think about where I want to work.   Unlike when I started my career, today,  thanks to the blend of my experience, area of expertise and technology, I can contemplate moving anywhere in the world.  I no longer need a fixed office or a permanent 9 – 5 job or even be based in the same country as my work / client.  I can seriously consider becoming one of a growing number of digital nomads.

This freedom and flexibility is behind the growing number of people becoming digital nomads.  Many of them are millennials not yet ready to settle down and wanting to travel the world but there is a growing number of seasoned professionals, like myself, who place increasing value on this freedom and flexibility.  Whilst many of the jobs these digital nomads do are as developers or content creators, and not always particularly senior, times are changing.  One of the roles I do for example, reverse mentoring, I can do extremely well remotely (in fact it is sometimes easier to share a screen remotely rather than squish around a physical screen in a room together) – all I need is good wifi.  For other work that requires me to be face to face it is generally easy enough to hop on a flight.  In fact it may even be cheaper for clients to have me working as a digital nomad, and pay for the long haul flight, simply because I can charge less per diem if I am based somewhere like Thailand as opposed to Switzerland.

Whilst being based near a beach does sound wonderfully rosy it is not without its drawbacks.  I am actually quite a settled, homey person, and would never have chosen to move jobs or countries this often by choice.  However this is the deck that I was dealt and I now also realise that life is short and that home is where you make it.  It is also thanks to my autoimmune disease that I have learned to truly value my quality of life.

Whilst I do not see myself being an endless digital nomad at this point in my life I feel it may be a good move for me.  I am still young  and healthy enough to do this.  There is still much of the world I want to explore and new skills I want to learn (like free-diving) but I do not have the resources, or inclination, to take a gap year and just travel.  I would like to continue working but travel – the classic digital nomad.  Who knows where I will end up – ideally with a permanent job somewhere near a beach 🙂  – but I feel ready for a new chapter in my life and a new journey.  And so I am starting to explore my options as a digital native, and in the process replacing the hopes and dreams I had with my ex with new hopes and dreams, and in doing so help my heart heal.

 

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The value of respecting your customers

The news is currently awash with a spectacular example of a company failing to have any respect for its customers.  When #United decided to have a paying passenger dragged off one its planes to accommodate employees, whom the airline felt had more right to be at work the next day than said customer, they showed a total disrespect for their customers.  The incident, and the initial response of the CEO, also showed a total lack of respect, and understanding, for the power of the citizen journalist and social media.

The fact that other customers filmed the shocking incident and shared it online really should not have come as a surprise, nor should the fact that it got picked up by the media and went viral.  The days of being able to just bury incidents under the carpet are gone.  Whilst not all examples of bad customer service go viral it is now a real danger for any company, and as such all companies need to start being much more vigilant to customer complaints, especially when these are posted to a social media network.

The other factor here is also basic marketing.  When I did my Masters in marketing one of the things we learnt was people talk more about a negative experience than a bad one. It is also accepted business wisdom that happy customers are more profitable for companies – they spend more and it is cheaper to retain them than it is to gain new customers.  The other thing we learnt was that a company can turn a customer with a negative experience into a loyal customer by the way they handle a complaint.   It is all about making the customer feel valued.

I have numerous personal examples that support these facts.  In fact my motivation for this blog post is not the United incident but my current debacle with Turkish Airlines. Right now I am an extremely unhappy customer and have been appalled at their dreadful customer service.  As a frequent flyer with airlines like British Airways I have come to expect a certain degree of customer service from reputable airlines and I had been under the impression that Turkish Airlines also fell into that category but clearly not.

The issue in question was entirely  my own fault but highlights the difference between an airline like British Airways and Turkish Airlines.  I recently booked my holiday to the Philippines but to my horror a couple of hours after paying for the flight I realised that I had booked the wrong dates (due to still being under the weather with my Hashimoto’s btw).  I called Turkish Airlines up immediately to try to find a solution to this.  I was greeted with an unfriendly and unhelpful rep who refused to help in anyway.  This is entirely at the discretion of the airline as I know that British Airways in these situations give you a grace period of 24 hours in case this happens.  Not Turkish.

Very distraught I wracked my brain for what to do as I now faced spending less than 5 full days on the beach for 3 and bit days of travel!  I then phoned them back to ask about buying a single ticket out on my original planned date and then using my return ticket as planned.  Again I spoke to a less than friendly and unhelpful customer service rep who informed my that this was also not an option.  I would have thought Turkish Airlines should have jumped at the option of selling me a second ticket, especially as I am sure the currently climate and laptop restrictions on flights will be impacting their sales.  I then complained via Twitter and got a much more friendly and helpful response – they lodged my issue as a complaint with customer services for me.  Yay!

But no.  I got an email from the customer complaints department that it would now take them around 7 days to get back to me!  In 7 days time I had hoped to be in a flight and also needed to organise my accommodation!  Why on earth would it take them that long to contact me?!  To this day I have still not had a response from them, despite numerous follow up tweets.  A swift response would have placated me, even if only to sell me that single ticket, but now days of silence later I am a very irate customer who is telling everyone I know, including some very frequent travelers who fly with Turkish (sorry … who used to fly with Turkish).  The window for Turkish Airlines to retain me and my friends as customers is rapidly closing – if they do not want my money I am sure many other airlines do.

This experience contrasts with my other recent travel experience, namely with the Radisson Hotel in Austin.  There I also complained about a few issues I had had at the hotel.  Their response however was very prompt, courteous and professional.  When I complained I really felt like I would never stay in a Radisson again but following their fantastic customer service they have managed to flip the situation and turned me into a loyal customer.  I now know that if I ever have issues again I can trust this hotel to resolve them in a positive manner and as a result I will have no issue in picking the hotel over another hotel on my next trip.

I am generally a very loyal customer (last year paying close to £1000 more just to fly with British Airways) and I, like many other customers, am actually quite easy to please.  Listen to me, respond to my contact request and treat me like a valued customer who you would like to retain.  It is my money to spend and I can easily spend it with another company.  Keep me happy, like British Airways always does, and I will tell people about my great experience and keep coming back.  Make me unhappy, especially by treating me like you have no interest in my future spend with you, and I will tell everyone I know and take my money elsewhere.

Whilst a single customer may not per se be of interest to the company, their friends, family and extended network may be.  As word of mouth spreads across that network, as is the case for United Airlines, you start to see a real impact on revenues.  Counter that with the cost of good, courteous and helpful customer service, it just makes good business sense to treat your customers with respect – each and everyone of them.

Addendum

Within an hour of writing this post I received the following response from Turkish.  I have no idea why it took them days to provide a standard response like this.  It also does not address some of my issues that I complained about.  You can see my response below too.  Clearly I will not be flying with Turkish Airlines again and I will continue to advocate against flying with them.  If you have had similar negative experiences with them I would love to hear about them too.

 

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