Sexy sunscreen

The other day I saw this video from Mashable about a new UV patch from L’Oreal that is meant to make applying sunscreen more fun.  Essentially the patch is a stretchable skin sensor designed to monitor UV exposure and can be scanned.  An accompanying app then tells you your exposure, can remind you to apply sunscreen and also uses AR to bring a little character to life (that’s the fun bit I presume).

UV

This video reminded me of a meeting I had many years ago when I was working agency side.  A cancer charity had approached us to discuss an app idea to try to encourage people to use sunscreen.  Their idea was not disimilar to this concept from L’Oreal (minus the cool patch and AR) – they wanted to develop an app that would inform sunbathers of the UV levels and thereby get them to apply sunscreen.

The only problem was their target audience was young men and they did not understand their customer.  They had presumed that knowing the UV levels, and subsequent danger and risks of skin cancer, that these young people would automatically apply sunscreen.  They were aghast when I, a sun worshiper, flipped it round and told them that this data could be taken to be when the best time would be to get the maximum tan.  I also challenged them that this app would never be used by an 18 year old on his first trip to Ibiza – unless his mum downloaded it for him and kept nagging him.

We then brainstormed around what it would take to get said 18 year old to apply sunscreen.  Warnings of skin cancer and health certainly were not going to work.  I came up with a very novel idea – partner with the big clubs and use sexy models. The concept was simple – have sexy models roaming the beach with sunscreen and get the guys to take photos and submit them to an online space.  The clubs could co-sponsor and thereby get some extra positive publicity.  The 18 year olds would learn about sunscreen from someone other than their mum and would, for that day at least, be safe – and hopefully thanks to the models sunscreen might become sexier. The photos would generate content and hopefully also buzz and with some careful promotion and PR had the potential to become a viral campaign.

Of course this idea never took – it was far to riskee for healthcare at the time and certainly for the conservative team from the charity.  This was of course a shame but it also speaks to a broader issue – namely really understanding your customers and taking risks, two things pharma is not always particularly good at.  There have been so many brilliant ideas, that would have benefited patients and would no doubt have been highly successful, but that die because the marketing teams involved are risk averse and conservative.  It is also this issue that has led to pharma’s dominance in healthcare being slowly eroded by risk taking, modern organisations like Apple and Google.  Until we can instill that same culture within the industry Pharma risks falling behind and not optimising all the opportunities that today’s cultural shifts and technology present.

 

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About pharmaguapa

I am an highly experienced consultant specialised in digital media marketing and strategy in the pharmaceutical industry.

Posted on July 9, 2017, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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