Category Archives: General

YouTube Healthcare

gotthard-tunnel-trafficLike many of us I have often struggled balancing regular exercise with a busy work schedule.  This is especially an issue for me as my sport of choice was swimming and the only time the pool here in Zurich is not like the Gotthard Tunnel during peak times is mid-afternoon.  I must also admit that even when work does permit my afternoon swim it can be all too easy to find reasons not to go swimming, particularly when it’s cold and wet outside.

We all know however that regular exercise is important – and for me that especially so as I control my autoimmune disease … and contend with my ageing body.  The fitness industry has blossomed as companies cater to this increased awareness of the value of exercise coupled with people’s busy schedules, as well as the increased pressure on us to look fit and healthy (thank you Instagram).  It is no surprise then to see the likes of Fitbit see revenue coming in at over $1 billion, as they take advantage of this dynamic.

It is however not just companies like Fitbit that are benefiting from need to exercise and be healthy.  There are a growing number of online influencers and sports trainers and coaches who are providing services and support to their customers online, for example through YouTube channels and blogs.  It is thanks to these, and today’s technology and the internet, that increasingly means people do not have to pay expensive gym (or pool!) memberships that they never use to get their exercise fix and indeed people no longer need to leave the comfort of their own home to exercise.

In my case it was my discovery on yoga on YouTube that led not only to me adding a new sport to list of hobbies but also led to me now doing exercise at least once a day (but most days twice).  I no longer have to allocate time in my calendar for travel to and from the pool, but rather can just hop on my yoga mat from home and get straight into a session.  Thanks to Youtube, and Yoga with Adrienne, I am now fitter than I have ever been.  Thanks to YouTube I have my own private “classes” at home – free of charge – which I can do whenever is the most convenient time for me.

Whilst we may like to focus on the sexy side of health tech – such as Wearables and VR – it is actually social media that is leading to some of the biggest impact in this area.  It is thanks to platforms like YouTube that we can see a democratisation of sport, where sport such as yoga, is no longer just for those who can afford to go to classes or gyms, but is now available to anyone.  The convenience that guided home exercise also makes this type of sport more accessible as people can fit their exercise routine in around their busy day – and not around when the classes are or when the gym is open.

We often hear about the negative side of people staying at home surfing the web – but here is an example of the positive side to this.  I for one will be forever grateful to YouTube, and Adrienne, for providing me with the option of practicing my new sport from the comfort of my home which not only helped me through a difficult time but also has helped me maintain my health … and keep my weight down.

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AR versus VR

This morning I was reading about the difference in opinion between Apple’s Tim Cook and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg on whether AR or VR is the future.  In my opinion they are both the future in their own different ways and for different audiences.

As an owner of a Samsung Gear VR I have to say that I think VR is pretty cool and can imagine it will only get cooler with newer technology.  The opportunities for VR are huge, from gaming, to education to healthcare.  I particular like the way VR is bringing hope and relief to patients, for example through sensory therapy for burns patients (the use of VR therapy during bandage changing saw a significant reduction in pain).

Currently though VR is still somewhat the domain of gamers and tech “geeks” like myself.  With the advent of cheaper headsets this may change but will VR ever become a mass market concept?  There I am not sure given the “isolationist” nature of VR – namely that you have a headset on which immerses you in the VR world but at the same time can “remove” you from the real world and real contacts.  I am not sure I can imagine the masses sitting around in their own world with their headsets.

AR on the other hand exists in the “real” world, being simply augmented over reality.  AR offers benefits in the same fields as VR, namely gaming, education and to a degree health too.  However the lack of full immersion can also make AR less impactful that VR.  What AR does offer however is the merging of technology and real world in a way that people can potentially enjoy together.  AR is no longer a new technology though and we also have not seen it take off to follow the hype that surrounded AR a few years back.  We also see AR still being used by individuals in their “own” worlds like the Pokemon gamers.  This could of course change with new uses and versions of AR, and AR could become something used by the masses in their daily lives, either individually or in groups.

Both technologies offer great hope and opportunity but in my opinion both will always remain more for the young or tech savvy rather than technology for the masses.  Both technologies have been surrounded by masses of hype that, to date, has not lived up to expectations.  I suspect both these technologies will slowly become part of the norm in certain situations, such as in sensory therapy in hospitals, quietly and without great fanfare, while much of the hype will vanish or move onto the next new technology.  But who knows ….

The era of digital nomads

In December one of my main client contracts will come to an end and as such I have been slowly starting to think about what I will do next year.  Much as I love living in Zurich it is a very expensive place to be based without a permanent job so I am toying with the idea of moving somewhere cheaper.  Having also just had my heartbroken by a Swiss chap I am also less happy here than I was and contemplating a move.

Traditionally people would move based on where their job is and for many the first move abroad is the result of a job offer.  This was true for me too – the first time I moved abroad as an adult was an office transfer from the McKinsey London office to their Zurich office.  Since then I have become a veritable frequent mover and have lived in Switzerland 5 times, Spain twice, Denmark once and London twice.  Most of the moves have been work related but not all, and not all by choice.  Some would say I’ve had my fair share of bad luck with work – redundancy, the brand I was working on failing in PhIII, interview & reality not matching up, etc. – but I like to think of it as good luck.  It is thanks to my luck that I have had this truly interesting career, with a breadth of highly relevant experience, with multiple organisations and in multiple countries.

It is thanks to this experience that I am also able to seriously consider not only what my next job will be but also seriously think about where I want to work.   Unlike when I started my career, today,  thanks to the blend of my experience, area of expertise and technology, I can contemplate moving anywhere in the world.  I no longer need a fixed office or a permanent 9 – 5 job or even be based in the same country as my work / client.  I can seriously consider becoming one of a growing number of digital nomads.

This freedom and flexibility is behind the growing number of people becoming digital nomads.  Many of them are millennials not yet ready to settle down and wanting to travel the world but there is a growing number of seasoned professionals, like myself, who place increasing value on this freedom and flexibility.  Whilst many of the jobs these digital nomads do are as developers or content creators, and not always particularly senior, times are changing.  One of the roles I do for example, reverse mentoring, I can do extremely well remotely (in fact it is sometimes easier to share a screen remotely rather than squish around a physical screen in a room together) – all I need is good wifi.  For other work that requires me to be face to face it is generally easy enough to hop on a flight.  In fact it may even be cheaper for clients to have me working as a digital nomad, and pay for the long haul flight, simply because I can charge less per diem if I am based somewhere like Thailand as opposed to Switzerland.

Whilst being based near a beach does sound wonderfully rosy it is not without its drawbacks.  I am actually quite a settled, homey person, and would never have chosen to move jobs or countries this often by choice.  However this is the deck that I was dealt and I now also realise that life is short and that home is where you make it.  It is also thanks to my autoimmune disease that I have learned to truly value my quality of life.

Whilst I do not see myself being an endless digital nomad at this point in my life I feel it may be a good move for me.  I am still young  and healthy enough to do this.  There is still much of the world I want to explore and new skills I want to learn (like free-diving) but I do not have the resources, or inclination, to take a gap year and just travel.  I would like to continue working but travel – the classic digital nomad.  Who knows where I will end up – ideally with a permanent job somewhere near a beach 🙂  – but I feel ready for a new chapter in my life and a new journey.  And so I am starting to explore my options as a digital native, and in the process replacing the hopes and dreams I had with my ex with new hopes and dreams, and in doing so help my heart heal.

 

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The value of respecting your customers … in pharma

My last post was all about the value of respecting your customers, particularly if you are an airline, and was based upon my terrible experience with Turkish Airlines.  To complete that article I should add that my experience with Turkish Airlines continued to be bad including during the flight with some of the most inedible food I’ve ever attempted to eat, old airplanes with seats that did not recline properly and grumpy crew.  My holiday itself however was awesome 🙂

As I looked back at this article though I thought it also worthwhile to add my opinion on respecting your customers in the pharmaceutical industry.  For too long this industry has been very self-centered and not particularly focused on customers, especially patients (who I also include as customers).  Of course the industry is “plagued” by regulation which has made it harder to be as customer centric per se as many other industries.  We all know by now that the end of the blockbuster era and the patent cliff ushered in huge change and a shift in thinking for the industry but we are still not where we should be.

So why are we still not as customer centric as we could be?  Regulation is often one of the first reasons bandied about for this … “we can’t talk directly to our patients” or “we can’t do that because of regulatory restrictions”.  Very often this is however just an excuse.  We can still be customer centric and comply with regulations.  For starters many patients do not want to hear promotional messages about pharma products anyway so even if we could bombard them with product branded marketing this would still be pharma and not customer centric.

Even where we can do promotion for it to be most effective it should be targeted and try to provide some value to the customer.  What is it that a physician needs or wants to hear about?  If we develop content – promotional or not – with the customer in mind then we generally see far greater results than if we just stubbornly try to force our message down their throats.

Coming back to the regulatory side of things though I do also believe that it is time regulators also become more customer centric, particularly towards patients.  Whist I do not support a US style DTC promotion I also believe that the pharma industry sits on a large swathe of data that would be highly valuable and beneficial to patients, and HCPs. Much of this data is never made available to patients – in part because of compliance but also in part because of the “fear” of regulation and legal action.  Counter this with the number of misinformation that patients now have access to online I think there needs to be a change in thinking in how we communicate and share information online.  I firmly believe that as an industry (both pharma & regulators) we have a duty of care to make sure that patients have access to accurate, reliable information.  We need to drown out the misinformation, and make sure that the correct information is coming in at the top of Google searches, and not hidden away a few pages in.

A second issue is that whilst many patients may never want to know the data, or indeed even understand it, there is a growing number of active and educated patients that do want more information.  The informed patient wants to have the data so that they can make their own decisions concerning their healthcare.  The days when we as patients blindly trusted what our doctors told us are diminishing.   As a patient who has experienced misinformation coming from a specialist, in my case an endocrinologist who told me that the symptoms form my un-managed Hashimoto’s were all in my head, I firmly believe in the movement of the informed patient and the need for patients to be more active in their healthcare.  Had I relied on that endocrinologist, and not actively sought my own answers, I doubt I would be here now writing this post as I would probably have either been too depressed or died of heart complications due to over-medication in an attempt to reduce my symptoms.

I think it is high time that all those involved in the healthcare system start to respect patients as decision makers and work together to support the informed patient.  How can we make all that data that pharma sits on, that may have no commercial value to the organisation btw, available in a digestible and understandable format for patients.  Pharma often has the money and resources to turn the data into content and disseminate it but may not be allowed to – or may not have the incentive to.  Much of that data may also have a public health benefit so one could also argue that pharma should not shoulder the burden of dissemination alone.  Pharma companies at the end of the day are businesses and if they are not profitable they will go under and that also does not benefit patients.

There are many more questions but there also numerous answers.  For starters pharma can start to work more closely with patient associations.  Why is it that for many pharma companies the patient advocacy department, if there even is one, is only made up of one or two people?!  Whilst we have huge brand teams focused on marketing to HCPs the number of headcount that is focused on patients is tiny by comparison.  Pharma really needs to start ramping up in this area.

In turn though regulators may also need to re-assess that pharma patient partnership model.  Not all diseases have a patient association but there may be online groups and individual patient experts.  How was can facilitate partnerships here for the benefit of all parties?  How can we all work together to find a model that supports patients, is compliant but also does not bankrupt pharma?  I think the answer lies in the question … we need to all work together!  We need to start talking more to patients, and include regulators in those discussions.  We need to put patients firmly in the center of the equation, along with HCPs.  We need to not only start listening more but also start being more active in driving the change needed to do this.  Only then will we start to see an industry that is truly respecting its customers and meeting their needs.

The value of respecting your customers

The news is currently awash with a spectacular example of a company failing to have any respect for its customers.  When #United decided to have a paying passenger dragged off one its planes to accommodate employees, whom the airline felt had more right to be at work the next day than said customer, they showed a total disrespect for their customers.  The incident, and the initial response of the CEO, also showed a total lack of respect, and understanding, for the power of the citizen journalist and social media.

The fact that other customers filmed the shocking incident and shared it online really should not have come as a surprise, nor should the fact that it got picked up by the media and went viral.  The days of being able to just bury incidents under the carpet are gone.  Whilst not all examples of bad customer service go viral it is now a real danger for any company, and as such all companies need to start being much more vigilant to customer complaints, especially when these are posted to a social media network.

The other factor here is also basic marketing.  When I did my Masters in marketing one of the things we learnt was people talk more about a negative experience than a bad one. It is also accepted business wisdom that happy customers are more profitable for companies – they spend more and it is cheaper to retain them than it is to gain new customers.  The other thing we learnt was that a company can turn a customer with a negative experience into a loyal customer by the way they handle a complaint.   It is all about making the customer feel valued.

I have numerous personal examples that support these facts.  In fact my motivation for this blog post is not the United incident but my current debacle with Turkish Airlines. Right now I am an extremely unhappy customer and have been appalled at their dreadful customer service.  As a frequent flyer with airlines like British Airways I have come to expect a certain degree of customer service from reputable airlines and I had been under the impression that Turkish Airlines also fell into that category but clearly not.

The issue in question was entirely  my own fault but highlights the difference between an airline like British Airways and Turkish Airlines.  I recently booked my holiday to the Philippines but to my horror a couple of hours after paying for the flight I realised that I had booked the wrong dates (due to still being under the weather with my Hashimoto’s btw).  I called Turkish Airlines up immediately to try to find a solution to this.  I was greeted with an unfriendly and unhelpful rep who refused to help in anyway.  This is entirely at the discretion of the airline as I know that British Airways in these situations give you a grace period of 24 hours in case this happens.  Not Turkish.

Very distraught I wracked my brain for what to do as I now faced spending less than 5 full days on the beach for 3 and bit days of travel!  I then phoned them back to ask about buying a single ticket out on my original planned date and then using my return ticket as planned.  Again I spoke to a less than friendly and unhelpful customer service rep who informed my that this was also not an option.  I would have thought Turkish Airlines should have jumped at the option of selling me a second ticket, especially as I am sure the currently climate and laptop restrictions on flights will be impacting their sales.  I then complained via Twitter and got a much more friendly and helpful response – they lodged my issue as a complaint with customer services for me.  Yay!

But no.  I got an email from the customer complaints department that it would now take them around 7 days to get back to me!  In 7 days time I had hoped to be in a flight and also needed to organise my accommodation!  Why on earth would it take them that long to contact me?!  To this day I have still not had a response from them, despite numerous follow up tweets.  A swift response would have placated me, even if only to sell me that single ticket, but now days of silence later I am a very irate customer who is telling everyone I know, including some very frequent travelers who fly with Turkish (sorry … who used to fly with Turkish).  The window for Turkish Airlines to retain me and my friends as customers is rapidly closing – if they do not want my money I am sure many other airlines do.

This experience contrasts with my other recent travel experience, namely with the Radisson Hotel in Austin.  There I also complained about a few issues I had had at the hotel.  Their response however was very prompt, courteous and professional.  When I complained I really felt like I would never stay in a Radisson again but following their fantastic customer service they have managed to flip the situation and turned me into a loyal customer.  I now know that if I ever have issues again I can trust this hotel to resolve them in a positive manner and as a result I will have no issue in picking the hotel over another hotel on my next trip.

I am generally a very loyal customer (last year paying close to £1000 more just to fly with British Airways) and I, like many other customers, am actually quite easy to please.  Listen to me, respond to my contact request and treat me like a valued customer who you would like to retain.  It is my money to spend and I can easily spend it with another company.  Keep me happy, like British Airways always does, and I will tell people about my great experience and keep coming back.  Make me unhappy, especially by treating me like you have no interest in my future spend with you, and I will tell everyone I know and take my money elsewhere.

Whilst a single customer may not per se be of interest to the company, their friends, family and extended network may be.  As word of mouth spreads across that network, as is the case for United Airlines, you start to see a real impact on revenues.  Counter that with the cost of good, courteous and helpful customer service, it just makes good business sense to treat your customers with respect – each and everyone of them.

Addendum

Within an hour of writing this post I received the following response from Turkish.  I have no idea why it took them days to provide a standard response like this.  It also does not address some of my issues that I complained about.  You can see my response below too.  Clearly I will not be flying with Turkish Airlines again and I will continue to advocate against flying with them.  If you have had similar negative experiences with them I would love to hear about them too.

 

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De Puy and their patients

This morning I spotted an article in The Telegraph about how patients may have been fitted with faulty hip replacements due to a manufacturing error at the De Puy plant.  According to the article De Puy is not being exactly responsive in answering questions on this and may have known about the problem for some time.  Ill fitted hip replacements can be very painful for patients and can even be a patient safety issue.

For me a few things sprung out of this issue.  First and foremost no healthcare manufacturer should ever ignore potential patient safety issues and if De Puy knew about this flaw  they had a duty of care to their patients to inform the regulators so that said patients could be closely monitored for potential problems.  We were all appalled by the recent car scandal where manufacturers lied and tried to ignore a manufacturing fault – but if De Puy did knowingly ignored this problem then they too deserve the same villification, if not more.  After all here we are talking about surgically implanted devices not cars – and a potential direct risk to patient safety.  After the healthcare’s efforts to address its reputation problems I will also be disgusted if this turns out to be another example of “big bad pharma” (whilst De Puy is a device company it is owned by pharma’s J&J).

Shocked at this news post I naturally went straight to the company’s home page to see if there was more news.  Afterall if I were a patient or had a member of the family with a De Puy hip joint I would presume that the company has posted something to their website to provide me with information.  I would also do the same if I worked for the media btw.  I was therefore very shocked at what I found on their website.

According to their website they are inspired by us (I read that as including patients) and listen to patients and yet there is no option for patients on the website!  As the image below shows they are only interested in HCPs, job seekers and vets.  What about the poor patients?  And indeed what about the general public and media?

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In this day and age not having a general information website open to the public is questionable to say the least.  This is doubly the case for devices which do not face the same strict regulatory requirements as pharma.  Now clearly HCPs are the company’s main stakeholders, which is fair enough, but with most people now turning to the internet for information, including patient’s friends and family, it seems ludicrous not to offer up some general information about the product that is going to be surgically implanted into the patient. My mother is likely to need a hip replacement in the near future and I will want to know all the details about the product, including the manufacturer, and I will visit their website and expect to find information there.

This is of course also an issue today with new of a faulty product hitting the news.  How can I trust a company that is apparently selling faulty hip replacements but refuses to acknowledge its end users the patients?  How can I trust a company that refuses to communicate with me – even if only to tell me that due to regulatory requirements they cannot share certain information?

The other thing I did was to check their Twitter handle – again an issue like this raises questions I want to ask the company via my medium of choice, i.e. social media.  Whilst it looks like someone has secured the Twitter handle that is as far as it goes.  Whether it is De Puy or someone else who owns this is unclear but either way this looks bad on De Puy.  Firstly if someone else has secured the handle then shame on De Puy for not having noticed this and resolved this issue.  If it is their handle then at least take ownership and make it look formal and just state that you have not launched it yet.  As it is it just further adds to my bad impression of De Puy.

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I know I am just an insignificant carer and my mother just another patient but I for one will be talking to my parents about this and suggesting that if their surgeon suggests a De Puy product they ask for other options.  I for one do not trust this company to insert a device into my mother.  I wonder how many other carers and patients will feel the same as a result of today’s news and today’s lack of transparency from De Puy?

All I wanted for Christmas …

This time of year is often a time of reflection.  It is a time of thinking about what you really want for Christmas – what items go on that famous Christmas list.  What are the things you would really love Santa to bring you – and being Santa you can wish for whatever you want.

This year there were some practical things on my list – including an electric blanket  and a pasta making machine (both of which I got – yay!).  There were also though some wishes and hopes on the list.  I have one wish every year and that is for donations and miracles for the dogs in the Bucov shelter that I support through Hope for Romanian Strays.  With now over 1500 stray dogs living in the shelter (with an original capacity for 700 dogs) and of those over 300 puppies, there is never enough funds to help them all.  The authorities do not provide enough food for that many dogs so it is up to us, and our supporters, to provide the additional food and care to try to keep the dogs alive.  There are constant medical and emergency cases, like newly born puppies or injured dogs dumped at the shelter gates – essentially being left there to die.  My wish did partly come true as thanks to some generous supporters and fundraising the dogs did get a Christmas meal.  This is of course a drop in the ocean but at least they did not go hungry on that special day.

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Puppies in the Bucov shelter getting their Christmas meal

My other Christmas wish this year relates to work.  Having left ZS in March I have gone back to working as a freelance consultant, culminating in an extremely busy December.  However with my contract coming to an end in January I am again looking for the next opportunity.  Whilst I would love the stability of a permanent job, the reality is there are not that many permanent roles for someone with my level of expertise and seniority.  I also have such a huge passion (and depth of experience) for my area of specialisation (healthcare digital and social media strategy) that I have no desire to even consider anything else (except perhaps animal rescue!).    I do also love the flexibility that working as a freelance brings and so I am putting feelers out again for some more contract work.  As always it is a balancing act between finding new opportunities and meeting the requirements for the current contract – and this is one of the down sides of freelance work.  I will have to start looking for the next opportunity whilst working flat out on the current contract – and find time to rescue dogs and take care of my health and personal life. I’m tired already just thinking about it!  And so I make my wish and I hope that one of my tweets or posts ends up fortuously in front of the right person at the right time and I end up with a new contract for 2016.  Fingers crossed ….

Linked to the above wish is another work related wish – a new laptop in the shape of the new Mircosoft Surface Pro.  Sadly this is not a wish that Santa was able to grant this Christmas because Microsoft decided that Europeans are second class citizens compared to the US and that we have to wait 6 months to get our hands on this new shiny gem.  My wish will have to continue being a wish only until March when I hear the Surface Pro will finally go on sale in the UK.  Annoying.

My final big Christmas wish of course has to be health related.  If you follow my posts then you know I have an autoimmune disorder called Hashimoto’s.  I think most patients with autoimmune disorders wish for improved (or at least stable) health.  When I am happy and love what I am doing (and get plenty of sleep, eat well, etc.) I have no issues whatsoever with my condition.  Sadly if I get over-stressed, sleep badly, or slip up on my food (e.g. eat something with Gluten in) I end up feeling pretty pants.  Of course I plod on but there will always be a wish for that magic pill to come along and make life easier – or indeed cure my condition.  That will stay a wish for a long time though as that is unlikely to happen!  My other, more realistic, wish therefore is that more people are educated about the reality of autoimmune diseases, including doctors.

I got to spend my Christmas this year with my family, including my brother who is a GP.  I was really saddened to hear that he had no idea the impact gluten (and diet in general) can have on patients with autoimmune diseases.  I am not sure if he took my gluten free diet that seriously – I suspect like many doctors he felt that just taking my pills should be remedy enough.  This makes me sad as I know the difference lifestyle makes on quality of life, and disease progression, for many patients with autoimmune diseases, but if doctors do not provide information or even support in this area then life just gets that bit harder.  There really is nothing more frustrating that having your condition dismissed by your doctor – or indeed your online research either.  Yes there is a large amount of incorrect and bad information online, but there is also a huge amount of life changing, accurate information out there.  The fact that some of this comes from patients makes it no less valuable or accurate.  Afterall how can a healthy doctor really understand what living with an autoimmune condition feels like and who are they to judge how we feel if we make lifestyle changes?  And so I wish that more doctors listen to their autoimmune patients and try to understand their needs and conditions better.  I wish more autoimmune patients had access to a great doctor like I do here in Switzerland.

If I could have my wish for a healthy 2016 and a new contract or opportunity to come true then I can also help make my first wish come true – I would be able to make a large donation to my charity and thereby rescue the lives of more vulnerable, neglected dogs in Romania.  So should you hear of any opportunities (perm or contract) then do let me know … and you can do your bit to help my wishes come true!

 

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Sahsa – one of Hope for Romanian Strays rescues guarding the Christmas food for the shelter dogs – and looking very festive in the process!

 

 

Can social media cause a miracle?

Last week I wrote about the hopeless task I faced in trying to find homes for 60 Romanian rescue dogs who were about to lose their shelter.  I truly did not think we could save them.  I certainly did not think we would be able to find places for the very traumatised ones – who would want to give a traumatised dog a 2nd chance?  I thought perhaps we could find a few homes for the sweeter gentle ones.  I hoped that through social media we could find those few places and maybe raise enough funds to rescue these poor dogs.

Then the ball started rolling.  A few more people joined the group and offered help.  All of a sudden we had an offer for 15 places in a shelter in the UK!!  My heart stopped – could this really be happening?  This would be truly amazing!  Sadly hurt ego’s resulted in this offer being withdrawn – we were gutted.  But we got back to looking.  Slowly more offers poured in.  A couple of dogs were offered a place with one shelter and couple more were offered a place with a foster and a few lucky ones got offered forever homes.  Now just over one week later we have found places for 32 dogs!  I would never in my wildest dreams have thought this possible.  I am totally utterly humbled by the out-pouring of offers of help.  Thanks to the power of social media we have managed to pull of a near miracle.  Thanks to people all over the world pulling together, sharing these dogs photos, posting on their walls, tweeting and ringing around we have managed to save the lives of 32 dogs in less than 10 days.

However in order to make this a total miracle we need to find homes for another  15 dogs and we need to somehow raise funds to cover the cost of transport.  The cost per dog is €120 prep fee and then around £150 for the transport.  A few dogs have been sponsored or their adopter are paying but for all the rest we have to pay.  That is a very large some of money.  So again I am hoping that social media can truly bring about this miracle.  If by sharing and posting we can find 40 people to sponsor one dog or 80 to sponsor half a dog and if by sharing we could find 15 people who could home one of these dogs than we will truly bring about a miracle.  So I ask each and everyone of you to share this post.  Donate if you can and let me know if you can help any of these dogs in anyway.

You can donate via Youcaring here or via paypal to me: pharmaguapa@hotmail.com (and if you are donating for a specific dog please let me know.

 

Dogs that still need homes are listed below.  Please share for them!

 

Basil - a lovely waggy-tailed chap who also has impaired vision due to illness

Basil – a lovely waggy-tailed chap who also has impaired vision due to illness

Greta - a very sweet lady with impaired vision due to an illness.

Greta – a very sweet lady with impaired vision due to an illness.

Tantalic - an old boy, scared but with a heart of gold

Tantalic – an old boy, scared but with a heart of gold

Rex is a great chap - he is scared of men and strangers but find with the ladies

Rex is a great chap – he is scared of men and strangers but find with the ladies

Max - another great chap with a gorgeous smile.  He is wary of strange male dogs but otherwise a chiroy little chap.  He is around 2 years old

Max – another great chap with a gorgeous smile. He is wary of strange male dogs but otherwise a chiroy little chap. He is around 2 years old

sweet LUPITA, 4 years old female, she was crying when we found her . She is dominant with some dogs over food. Friendly and loving to people, she barks at strangers as has a protective instinct. 18 kg 47 cm high castrated

sweet LUPITA, 4 years old female, she was crying when we found her . She is dominant with some dogs over food. Friendly and loving to people, she barks at strangers as has a protective instinct. 18 kg 47 cm high castrated

Lea - dog on the left - very sweet 3 year old castrated lady. Lovely and not aggressive.

Lea – dog on the left – very sweet 3 year old castrated lady. Lovely and not aggressive.

Indy - a gentle giant.  Indy is a large lady around 3 years old with a lovely character - a total sweety

Indy – a gentle giant. Indy is a large lady around 3 years old with a lovely character – a total sweety

Griutu 1, a scared 5 year year old boy. Let's show him there's is more to life that Romania and find him a place to grow old free from fear. He deserves a home.

Griutu 1, a scared 5 year year old boy. Let’s show him there’s is more to life that Romania and find him a place to grow old free from fear. He deserves a home.

Griutu 2. An old, quiet boy who will not survive on the streets - we need to find him an urgent retirement home - old dogs deserve a chance too and certainly do not deserve to die in pain on the streets. Help us find him a home

Griutu 2. An old, quiet boy who will not survive on the streets – we need to find him an urgent retirement home – old dogs deserve a chance too and certainly do not deserve to die in pain on the streets. Help us find him a home

BRIANNA, a beautiful dingo-like lady, sterilized, around 2-3 yearsold. Sometimes she has big mouth on her but she is a total softy, not aggressive with humans at all. This adorable girl needs a home urgently

BRIANNA, a beautiful dingo-like lady, sterilized, around 2-3 yearsold. Sometimes she has big mouth on her but she is a total softy, not aggressive with humans at all. This adorable girl needs a home urgently

This chap has gone through so much - can we prevent him going through more pain?

This chap has gone through so much – can we prevent him going through more pain?

A happy waggy tailed dog soon to die miserably on the streets if we do not help

A happy waggy tailed dog soon to die miserably on the streets if we do not help

Griutu - an older chap who is a little scared but with some TLC will make a wonderful addition to a family

Griutu – an older chap who is a little scared but with some TLC will make a wonderful addition to a family

A desperate cry for help

I generally rave about how wonderful social media is but sometimes it can also be devastating.  Yesterday I found out that 60 Romanian rescues will be essentially sent to their death on the 17th October.  I have been following the care of these dogs on Facebook and have been helping try to find them homes.  Their time is now up and they will die.  I feel helpless, powerless and utterly distraught.

As you may know I am very active and passionate in trying to save dogs in Romania through my charity Hope for Romanian Strays.  My passion is driven by the sheer horror of how the thousands of stray animals are treated, with dogs often beaten to death, maimed by other dogs, poisoned and so on.  Whilst the shelter we support is one of the better ones, others are rightly nicknamed “death shelters” – dogs are routinely starved or beaten to death, succumb to disease or are killed by other dogs and the survivors are traumatised and live in poor desperate misery with minimal shelter or food.

All of this horror was unknown to me before I got active on social media.  I would perhaps have read the add newspaper article or seen a TV programme, but for the whole I was not exposed to some of the most extreme and brutal animal cruelty in the world. Now I see it on a very regular basis.  Needless to say it is always distressing and fuels my passion to help. Despite not wanting another cat I ended up rescuing a second one.  Despite needing to save money I donate a large part of salary every month. And despite being overwhelmed with the huge need of my own charity I still also support a few individual women who rescue dogs despite their own meager resources.

Puppies - who will soon certain death on the streets

Puppies – who will soon certain death on the streets

It was therefore absolutely devastating to hear this week that one of these rescuers, Anca Florea, was about to have all her dogs evicted.  A few months ago Anca’s private shelter was raised to the ground – it was a ramshackle enclosure but she provided food and shelter to some very needy dogs.  A group of us got together and started funding private foster places for Anca and trying to find homes.  Anca then fell very ill and was hospitalised. Without her constant reminders over Facebook people started to forget about the dogs.  The funds for the foster places have all but dried up.  Anca took many of the dogs into her own home despite her ill health.  Despite having to pay for her healthcare she still somehow managed to feed the dogs – albeit very very little.

This dog has already known the misery of the streets & soon will go back to that misery

This dog has already known the misery of the streets & soon will go back to that misery

Now the 60 dogs are to be evicted.  She has the option of letting the dogcatchers come – cruel men paid per dog they catch regardless of how (resulting in many dead and injured dogs).  They will take her rescued dogs, who have now known love and warmth, to a death shelter where the old and infirm dogs and puppies will definitely die relatively quickly but miserably.  A few of the younger strong ones might last  a year or so if they are “lucky” before succumbing to starvation and disease.  To Anca this is not an option.  When the day comes she will take them to a field and give them a fighting chance on the streets.  Sadly the old and infirm and the puppies will almost certainly die.  The younger ones, if they are not caught, will have a better chance.  The reality is though that on the 17th 60 dogs that were safe will have their death sentences signed.  They will face a winter of misery, pain, starvation, disease and eventually a horrible death.

A happy dog soon to be in danger on the streets

A happy dog soon to be in danger on the streets

And now I feel helpless, powerless and utterly distraught.  The mighty social media that has helped me so much with my health, brought so much benefit into my life now fails me.  It opens my eyes to a horrific reality for some wonderful, happy dogs that are loved.  I have shared their photos.  I have begged for help via Facebook.  I have asked people to retweet, repin, repost their photos.  I have reached out to everyone I know asking if they know anyone who could help save just even 1 dog.  I have failed.  Social media has failed me.  I have no idea what more I can do.  All I can say is I will continue to post, to beg and to pray with every inch of my being that a miracle happens and some place can be found for these poor poor dogs.  I will continue to beg you to share their posts, to share their photos in the hope that if everyone shares these photos someone out there will see them and decide to help.  That through sharing we can save these lives.  That you will help me save 60 dogs in desperate need through sharing this and that in doing so will restore my faith in social media to do good.  Will you do that for me and for them?

 

UPDATE:  A fundraiser has been started to raise funds for transport to foster places. Please donate if you can.  http://www.youcaring.com/pet-expenses/help-save-anca-s-dogs/246573

This puppy won't survive alone on the streets - will you help her?

This puppy won’t survive alone on the streets – will you help her?

A lab-mix who I'm sure could find a home if we tried

A lab-mix who I’m sure could find a home if we tried

Tibi - an old dog that will not survive on the streets

Tibi – an old dog that will not survive on the streets

anca-oct3

A little terrier - small dogs have a worse chance on the streets

A little terrier – small dogs have a worse chance on the streets

A happy waggy tailed dog soon to die miserably on the streets if we do not help

A happy waggy tailed dog soon to die miserably on the streets if we do not help

Ursulica - a lovely lady who wants to have a home of her own

Ursulica – a lovely lady who wants to have a home of her own

 

 

This chap has gone through so much - can we prevent him going through more pain?

This chap has gone through so much – can we prevent him going through more pain?

Already traumatised from abuse on the streets soon to go back to her worst nightmare

Already traumatised from abuse on the streets soon to go back to her worst nightmare

One of Anca's early rescues - has not been on the streets for years - she won't know  how to survive

One of Anca’s early rescues – has not been on the streets for years – she won’t know how to survive

Safe off the streets today but next week in danger again

Safe off the streets today but next week in danger again

Another small dog who will be in more danger on the streets

Another small dog who will be in more danger on the streets

A look of hope - please make that hope come true and help us

A look of hope – please make that hope come true and help us

The evolution of medicine

The other day I listened to a really interesting presentation by Tom Blue, Chief Strategy Officer, American Association of Private Physicians, on the evolution of medicine. He made some fantastic points about how medicine, and the industry surrounding it, has changed over the years. It started with our battle against infectious disease, and the magic bullet approach (which became the blockbusters of yester year), and then evolved into specialisation and compartmentalisation around the different organs. Today we face a new era as our medical understanding has increased and where we understand that a heart ache may not just be related to heart but may be an indication of an overall systemic wide disease. Whereas we have built up an industry based on organ specialisation in fact it is that the GP is closer to the reality – a broad view across organs.

For me this totally resonates and makes total sense. Having been to specialists who focused totally on the organ (in my case the thyroid) it was my own research that led to pinpoint what the actual, systemic cause of my thyroid problems were. Admittedly it probably did not help that my Spanish endocrinologist was a heart-less, disinterested and unprofessional medic but had she had a broader vision she could have told me that in fact the problem with my health lay not in my thyroid but in my immune system.

The industry’s focus on organ speciality has not always had a positive impact on systemic disease like autoimmune disorders. When my mother came down with Churg-Strauss syndrome it took nine specialists to diagnose her as each was focused on their own speciality organ rather than her system as a whole – my GP brother actually diagnosed her sooner over the phone because he had a broader perspective.

When you look at all the specialists we have we do have some broader specialities like oncologist but there are few immunologists focused on auto-immune disorders. Pharma companies also need to move their focus from finding products to treat symptoms to looking for products to tackle the diseases. Cures would be fantastic but in the meantime products that reduce the effects of auto-immune responses (rather that treat the organ being attacked) are greatly needed.

However the healthcare industry is a very conservative industry focused on heavily entrenched ways of doing things – from the medical side as well as the industry side. Just seeing the slow battle of trying to introduce new technology and ways of interacting with patients it would be fair to guess that the change needed in how medicine is practiced and how products are developed will take even longer.

So perhaps rather than grumble at the various pharma websites that provide no interactivity or value I should applaud them for at least having made an effort. The next steps needed for modernisation will be far scarier and will require a huge industry wide shake-up. But who knows – perhaps the big leap required for digital and social media will help shake some of those traditional foundations enough to drive change?

 

Medicine of old

Medicine of old