Social media – then and now

I have been working in pharma social media for over ten years and I am happy to say I have seen a huge amount of change during this time.  Back in the day there were only a few of the big pharma companies that actually had a presence on social media, and virtually none of these actually engaged or enabled any form of two way discussion.

In the early days Facebook allowed pharma companies to have comments disabled which led some to set up Facebook pages that were essentially just another way of broadcasting corporate blurb, safe in the knowledge that people could not engage with them.  One of the exceptions was Boehringer Ingelheim who very early on saw the value in engaging with stakeholders. Then it all changed when Facebook removed the exception and from one day to the next comments become enabled. This led to many closing their Facebook accounts and for some it took years before they set up a page again.

Fast forward to today and most big pharma have a Facebook page of some sort.  Most are now also on YouTube and Twitter – but again not all.  I am still amazed that in this day and age, when social media has become a main communication channel, that big pharma companies are not present on Twitter.  That said many of those that are present are not using Twitter well or delivering (and getting) value from the platform.  An example of this is around conferences where more HCP participate remotely than in person, and yet many company Twitter feeds still only cater to those physically present at the event.

One of the reasons for this remains a lack of understanding of the channel, how to use it and the value it could, and should, be delivering.  This is compounded by a lack of resourcing in this channel, still seen by many as a “nice to have” or a dalliance, rather than a main stream channel. This lack of resources is seen both in terms of lack of training but also in terms of teams and content.

One of the results of this lack of attention to this channel is that what is being shared has often been of low value, which results in low engagement, which then compounds the issue as managers show these low results as justification for not investing in the channel.   Another issue that this is a channel that is hard to tie directly to sales results, and which tends to need long term investment.

This is however a channel that we as an industry must accept and start using properly, as more and more people stop using email as their main channel and turn to social media instead (this has already happened in China for example).  If we want to engage with our customers we have to learn to engage properly through the channel of their choice.  The days of broadcasting the message we want to, via our channel of choice, regardless of what our customers want, have gone, and we must move with the times if we want to remain relevant and competitive.

About Pharmaguapa

I am an highly experienced consultant and reverse mentor specialised in digital media marketing and strategy in the pharmaceutical industry.

Posted on Jul 26, 2019, in Facebook, marketing, Multichannel, Social Media, Twitter and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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